• Drop me an email if you want to call.
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Free Books Southampton – At The Third Age Center Recycle Your Old Books

Another fantastic group writing for us again this week. This time with the duel purpose of love for books and planet, by providing a place for unwanted books to be loved again. Here it is, Free Books Southampton.

Free Books Southampton (FBS) is a volunteer led group based at the Third Age Centre (3AC),
in partnership with Transition Southampton. We take in donated books and redistribute
them to the community in Southampton and further afield.

“Second hand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in vast flocks
of variegated feathers and have a charm which is domesticated volumes of the library lack”
– Virginia Woolf

We are very lucky to receive generous book donations from different places; from
individuals, schools, libraries or shops etc, who are having a clear out and do not have space
for them. By taking books from us, you are reducing the amount of waste that goes into
landfills each year and you are helping to recycle valuable resources.

Most of the books we get given are in good, readable condition. However, we do receive
books that are worn and damaged. Those that are not in good nick get used in various arts
and craft projects at the 3AC and across the city. We encourage others to recycle books that
cannot be used for reading anymore and we can happily provide some for people to use in
their craft projects. Our own most favourite creation is the book hedgehog using such
books. Just two simple folds on a page repeated throughout the book can make a cute
creature. We have taught people how to make these at many events in Southampton.
We are a small team of volunteers who work together to sort through donations, put books
out on display, making them look presentable, running the Facebook and Twitter social
media sites, emails and giving books out at community events.

 

Being based at the 3AC means we can provide free books to those who want them 7 days a
week. All you have to do is stop by, browse our selection and help yourselves! We have
most genres ranging from; sci-fi, thriller, romance, non-fiction, autobiographies and children
just to name a few. There is no excuse to not read, there is something for everyone and they
are FREE!

We are very lucky to be supported by a great community in Southampton. We have been
asked to give books out at a number of events. Not only are we able to give books to those
in Southampton, more recently we were able to donate 271 books to Brikamaba Primary
School in Gambia. We would not be able to do things like this if we did not receive
donations! In 2017 we gave out 5166 books and we are hoping to beat that total this year.

If you would like more information about Free Books Southampton please do not hesitate to
send us an email booksforfree.soton@gmail.com, send us a Facebook message or drop by
the 3AC.

“I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library” – Jorge Luis Borges

Who and What are Let Pompey Breathe? By Alexa Gill & Anna Koor #letpompeybreathe

Let Pompey Breathe is a campaign group made up of several environmental groups and parties concerned about the poor air quality in Portsmouth and the lack of action to date from the council. We believe it is everybody’s right to be able to breathe clean air. The main purpose of the campaign is to reduce air pollution in Portsmouth and bring it down to legal levels. We’re asking the council to commit to reduce air pollution to meet WHO standards as soon as possible.

 

Air Pollution is a problem

Currently Portsmouth’s air quality is among the worst in the UK and it’s widely thought that 95 premature deaths a year in the city are related to air pollution. However, this figure is based on small particulates (PM2.5) such as emitted from diesel vehicles. When taking into account the effect of nitrogen oxide (NOX) and other air pollutants, that figure is worryingly thought to be as much as 6 times that. Furthermore, Portsmouth’s air pollution problem has been identified as roadside NOX pollutants. In February 2018 ClientEarth won a court hearing ruling that 33 authorities were in breach of meeting the government’s targets on legal levels of air pollution. Portsmouth was among those authorities.

 

Strong action is needed

Since the campaign launched, we’ve been out in the local community spreading the word about our concerns. In April we staged a peaceful demonstration outside the city civic offices, using ‘grave stones’ to highlight the number of premature deaths that are caused by air pollution. One of our campaigners delivered a letter to several key members of the City Council, calling for strong action to tackle the problem. Green MEP for the South East, Keith Taylor was in attendance. That evening he, along with 2 speakers from Let Pompey Breathe spoke about the air pollution issues we are facing across the city and why it’s so important we try to tackle this public health crisis.  

Since the beginning of May we’ve been focused on collecting signatures for the petition we’ve got running, asking the council to commit to reducing air pollution in the city. Anyone who lives, works or studies in Portsmouth can sign the petition. We’ve had stalls at a local Green Film Festival and at different points around the city. Residents are receptive and keen to sign. We’ve also had a bit of press, giving an interview on the local radio station. We’ve just reached the required 1000 signatures to ensure the issue is debated at full council. But we still need more! The greater number of people we can reach to sign the Petition, the further we’re able to go in demonstrating to the council that the electorate want action on this matter. If you are not eligible to sign, sharing it with people who are would be a great help.

The first step would be for the Council to publish an Air Quality Action Plan for consultation. It’s important they do this as a collaborative approach to developing robust and sustainable solutions to the problem. Everyone needs to have an input including local businesses, residents and environmental groups.

Get Involved

If you want to participate in tackling this issue, a great way to do so is donate your time and or money to organisations that are working to fight this problem. Some suggestions are ClientEarth, Earth Justice, Friends of the Earth, Green Peace. Or consider the Green Party to help get more councillors elected who will stand up for clean air.

We are always looking for volunteers to help with the #letpompeybreathe campaign, and increase our network. Please get in touch if you want to get involved!  

For a plastic free revolution we need new lenses by @MarIntroini

A simple question – one in which Mar asked me (@rwscarter- Ryan) about recently while I was on the radio, what is more important? Education or Innovation?

Well here is her answer.

 

A matter of Education or Innovation: which “lenses” come first? For a real plastic free revolution we need a solid educational framework that shapes habits and attitudes for finally building a new green culture. Parallel to this process is Innovation on technology, an essential element and an ally for green goals.

We need to be educated to adapt effectively to the new challenges by changing habits and at the same time innovate and make this process easy and sustainable within a world that moves through digitalization. A green future should be based on Education and Innovation and also through an innovative educational framework that delivers values around protection to the environment.

Let´s have a look at some data to wake up to a devastating reality around the environment and in particularly in relation to plastics:

An estimated of 12 million barrels of oil is required to produce the plastic bags used in US each year.

A million plastic bottles are bought around the world every minute and the number will jump another 20% by 2021*

Around 50% of plastic is used just once and thrown away*

More than 8 million tons of plastic is dumped into our oceans every year*

Alarming figures that wake up our society to a new sensible issue that demands action not only in terms of business options but also on a complete reshape of our lifestyle and system. A revolution….

Now, the system moves through a legal framework, is it possible to make a revolution against plastics without a complete reform of the legal system? Even if private initiatives are dominating the stage of the green market is it not enough and we need a full commitment from the public sector and definitely a new ambitious legal status.

Is precisely legislation that boosts a green way of doing business although always with the support of bottom up initiatives. Which is clear is that we cannot rely only on the latest and the progress would come from top down strategies that display commitment and structure for a system change.

We need leaders with vision, -not necessary visionary- but with the political will to make a change. Not only for cancelling the “plastic industry” but to give alternatives that reconvert the sector into a new and productive industry able to reinvent themselves with innovation and creativity. Is it here that the political support becomes paramount in terms of investment on innovation. From the side of the plastic misuse and irresponsible consumption we must be focused on educating individuals and change their lifestyle no matter the influence of the public sector. The private sector could play a very important role on changing cultural habits by using the speed of social media and the powerful influence of a global structure. Multinationals are key actors to implement new practices and develop new individual habits on an equal impact around the world. In which cultures are not a burden but the necessary complementary element.

Even if political support is a very important factor to take into account, U.S. is a good example that is not necessary essential, which is definitely very important is a legal framework that allows the continuity of pursuing Green goals. The focused policies from Mr. Trump against the own existence of climate change and the investment on clean energies have exposure the power of individual action from millions of citizens in America that want to fight back and are achieving green results with or without public support. This rebellion from the citizenship (coming from all the Political parties) gives the green revolution a new boost and a new vision in which the center of the initiatives are not public. That is precisely what we need for a results-driven strategy against plastics: the determination and awareness from the citizens to make a change of their traditional lifestyle on an almost anarchic basis.

Despite the traditional standardization of concepts, habits and business we must make the effort of “seeing green” where others are not able to do so. The environment depends on this individual option of delivering clean practices. Is our responsibility and empower us to become active agents for change.

Vision it´s important to see the devastating impact of plastics in oceans and in our lifestyle, however there is an even more important element that is awareness and information. Both are missing and clearly the data is not coming from the pubic sector but from an active and engage civil society.

Its ‘a historical momentum for a radical change of the “lenses” of mistaken traditions and move towards a new vision on green, with or without public support.

*http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/iceland-plastic-free-packaging-own-brand-products-recycling-pollution-environment-a8161081.html

* SDG´s 12+14= the panoptic for plastic waste

*https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jun/28/a-million-a-minute-worlds-plastic-bottle-binge-as-dangerous-as-climate-change

*https://www.plasticoceans.org/the-facts/

Stop Supermarkets using non-recyclable food Packaging

This is a guest piece by an active campaigner on plastic pollution and one who is pushing, as we are, for action from above.

The person behind the petition that asks for the CEO’s of all major UK super markets to drop or change the use of plastic for food wrapping, to no wrapping where it not needed, compostable if it is possible and as minimum recyclable. CrowdLeaf.org.uk are fully behind this and we offer a range of green and environmentally responsible products in the CrowdLeaf Store.

The petition can be found at : https://www.change.org/p/stop-supermarkets-using-unrecyclable-food-packaging

My name is Simon Goldsmith, I started a petition to ‘Stop Supermarkets using non-recyclable food Packaging’ because l got so annoyed when trying to recycle and reading on most of the plastic packaging ‘This plastic is not currently recycled’.

This made me think how much of our supermarket food packing is not currently recyclable. I found a large majority of it is the fruit and veg and to be honest 90% of this does not need any sort of packaging.

This made us change the way we shop, to finding a farm shop and buying all our fruit and veg from there. I appreciate this is not achievable for everyone, as some farm shops can be considerably more expensive and not convenient.

The final push for me was on our family holiday to Porthtowan in Cornwall. We were shocked by the micro-plastics on the beach.

As a consumer, we can’t choose how our food is packaged, the Supermarkets have an environmental obligation to make the packaging environmentally friendly. A consumer needs to be able to trust and respect the corporation they are buying from.

I understand the Supermarkets don’t package the food themselves but they have the power to make the producers comply.

Hopefully my petition will raise awareness and put pressure on the Supermarkets to change.

The more single-use plastic that is produced means it will eventually end up in landfills in developed countries and rivers and oceans in developing countries, then getting moved around the world’s oceans.
I believe the plastic problem needs to be tackled at both ends, one to reduce the amount of plastic being produced and two to clean up the current plastic in circulation in the oceans.

Currently in the UK there is no service industry cleaning our beaches, only volunteer organisations like Surfers Against Sewage.
I would like to setup a service industry which cleans our beaches in the UK and provides a use for the plastics. The only way the plastics are removed from the ocean is if the beaches are cleaned on a regular basis, currently the plastics get washed up and then moved again by the tides.

This is a serious problem as the fish are eating the plastics and we are eating the fish, the whole food chain is being affected. The effect the plastics are having on the wildlife is detrimental, and this is only getting worse.

I would like to be able to do more and the petition is just a starting point.

The Wave of Plastic Pollution is a problem – @AdamManning of @GreenHampshire & @rwscarter of @CrowdLeaf

Plastic in our natural environment has become an urgent issue that our society needs to address and Ryan recently focused on this in his once a month CrowdLeaf radio slot with Xan Phillips on VoiceFM 103.9. (This is on from 8pm on the first Thursday of the month.) Plastic in the form of nurdles and plastic products are a serious problem for marine life, beach life and for the food system.
Many people who believe they are being as good to the environment as they can be do not knowingly pollute the seas with plastic or other products. However, plastic fibres from polyester and acrylic clothing are polluting the seas on an industrial scale. One 6kg wash produces 140,000 fibres from polyester-cotton blend, half a million polyester fibres and nearly 3/4 of a million acrylic fibres.
If each and every house is doing this just once a week that is an awfully large quantity and the rate at which people throw away clothes is pandemic. It is worse to throw these away than it is to wash them and the onus should be on the producers of such items to change the material to stop the pollution at source.
There are alternatives that companies can and should be looking at such as natural products, lyocell made from trees, leather made from Pineapple and more… and we as consumers need to demand these.

One important way forward is to take advantage of producers who are using alternative products to traditional plastics.
These scary numbers are just the beginning. Micro fibres from soaps, body wash and cosmetic products are also washing down our drains into the seas. Recently a plastic soup of millions of pieces of plastic was discovered in our oceans. Earlier this year, 38 million pieces of plastic were found on Henderson Island. What is this doing to our natural habitats? Our animal welfare laws wouldn’t allow this for pets but for wildlife, sadly we have different standards.

The problem of plastic pollution often becomes clear during the course of a litter pick. Litter picking as a form of environmental activism has grown markedly in popularity in recent years. Individuals are taking the initiative to clear up rubbish, as are groups of many different sizes. This includes volunteer groups who look after particular areas, such as Friends of Weston Shore, larger and more established organisations such as the Keep Britain Tidy or the Marine Conservation Society and now new, online initiatives, such as #2minutebeachclean and Litterati.

Keen litter pickers will spend a lot of time picking up plastic items in an event of this sort. Their work is vital in clearing up our natural environment as plastic will, if not removed, last effectively forever.
At a larger scale than plastic fibres, this includes plastic bottles, for water or soft drinks. As well as spoiling the natural beauty of an area, they can be a danger to wildlife. Mice and shrews can climb into them, perhaps spotting a mouthful of water to drink inside, and then be unable to climb up out again, leaving them trapped. Other animals, similarly looking for a drink, can trap their snouts or beaks in a plastic bottle, making them unable to shake them off.

Plastic ring binders are another serious problem. These are the loops of plastic that are typically used to keep groups of four or six beer cans together. They can snare both land living animals like foxes, birds and even snakes but also, if they are caught by the tide, turtles, dolphins and other sea life. There is a famous case of a young turtle entwined in a twisted six pack ring whose body deformed as it grew, until its body ultimately became a figure of eight, the ring still stuck around its unnaturally narrow waist. If they are not removed from the environment, they pose a danger to wildlife.

Cotton buds are another persistent problem. These small lengths of plastic tubing are all over our beaches, washed up by the tide. People use cotton buds to clean their ears and noses or for arts and crafts, household cleaning and other uses round the house. It seems that after they have been used, some people throw them down the toilet to dispose of them. The cotton buds then go through our sewage system, which is not designed for such products. Later, they are flushed out to sea only to ultimately end up washed up on our shores, without the fluffy cotton bits at either end, which will have disintegrated in the sewage system. Surveys by the Marine Conservation Society indicate that 60% of sewage related beach litter is from cotton buds. Just don’t throw them down the toilet!

Nurdles are another form of plastic pollution, especially on our beaches. These are tiny beads of plastic, about the size of lentils, used in the creation of plastic products. They end up in our natural areas, including our shores, from spills or accidents while they are being shipped from place to place in the production process. Nurdles, like the plastic fibres we are learning about, represent a serious pollution problem, both in the water and on land. They attract and concentrate other pollutants to them. Like all plastic, they can fragment and breakdown into smaller pieces, becoming harder to handle and remove. Animals of all sorts can mistake nurdles for food like fish eggs or seeds, especially in the water, and this can make them sick or kill them.

Part of the problem with nurdles in our natural environment is that their small size makes them difficult to remove. An average litter picker will be unable to pick them up. Chesil Bay in Southampton, a beautiful part of the shore in the city, has a particular nurdle pollution problem. In some patches this is so bad, there seems to be more nurdles than soil.

Nurdles and other plastic debris often ends up in being deposited in natural areas because human created parts of the environment, such as sea walls, docks or piers are hard surfaces. When the plastic debris comes into contact with these, the nurdles, cotton buds and so forth, are deflected away. As a result, when they come to rest in a natural area, this will be where they stay. So, nurdles and other plastic debris tend to build up on a natural area of shoreline.

There is an urgent need to take action at each stage of the plastic production process so that our natural environment is not ruined in the way that has been building up for years.






Start a #Sustainability #Movement in Your #Organization: Part 1 – Steps to Follow : Wendy Firlotte @EngageIntl

​When I talk to organizations of all sizes and functions, their biggest pain point is essentially the same, lack of participation.  Consistently, the two biggest challenges I hear are obstacles to increasing stakeholder buy-in and deal with competing priorities in the workplace.

In corporate responsibility & sustainability, we talk about being purpose driven and embedding sustainability within the organization, but what does that mean exactly? Essentially, we are looking for ways to mobilize employees and resources toward a shared sustainability purpose. In other words, what we want to know is how do we start a sustainability movement? This is the first installment of a 6 part series where we will discuss what starting a sustainability movement means, what it takes and the key elements for success.

Before getting into how to start a sustainability movement within your organization, let’s watch a TED talk by Derek Sivers (3 mins) and break down the basic steps and key insights of starting a movement in general.

Observed steps and key insights from the video:

  1.    Leaders need to create actions that are easy to follow and show the first follower how to follow. The first followers will then show everyone else how to follow.
  2.    Leaders embrace followers as equals, so it’s about the movement, not about the leader.
  3.    The first follower is an underestimated form of leadership. It takes courage to stand out and do something new and different.
  4.    Actions must be public. It’s important to not only show the actions of the leader, but also the followers. New followers will emulate other followers, not the leader.
  5.    After the first few join, others will join because it’s less risky. Then you hit the tipping point.
  6.    Afterward, those who were sitting on the fence before, have no reason now not to join. They won’t stand out, they won’t be ridiculed, but they will be part of the in-crowd if they hurry.
  7.    Then you have a movement.

I love that these insights are clear and simple, but I also wanted to add some key ideas that relate these steps to engaging employees in internal sustainability programs; many of these will be discussed in greater detail later in the series.

Create relevance for the program beyond company purpose. If a mission isn’t relevant to employees on a personal level, outside of work, it’s not likely to resonate with them at work either. How does your company’s sustainability agenda align with a greater purpose, allowing employees to contribute to the global good? Are you relating similar actions in their daily lives at home?

The UN Sustainable Development goals are a great way to create greater overall relevance. It provides a collective (global) way forward to address the world’s most pressing issues, but allows companies to choose the goals that align with their purpose and materiality priorities. With this greater vision and purpose, employees can participate make the broader connections with the meaning behind their brand experiences.

Meeting people where they are. A key element to increasing participation is by creating programming to engage employees that reflect their varying levels of understanding and willingness to participate. Do you have activities planned to accommodate these levels of employee involvement to meet them at their highest level of engagement and potential impact?

Law of diffusion of innovation principle. According to research, the required percentage of uptake in order to achieve the tipping point when adopting new innovations is only 16 %. (That lovely number makes the task seem more manageable, right?) Here is a great talk by Simon Sinek, where he discusses the law of diffusion in more detail.

Share employee experiences. Create fun, engaging, and relatable experiences for participating employees to share and inspire others to get involved. You could highlight and share articles, videos, blogs, pictures, posts, tweets, etc. Harness the powerful resource of employee influence and amplification in networks, on social media and word of mouth.

Cultivate followers and equip them to be advocates. Advocates and enthusiasts can be your strongest resource. We are very much social beings and are strongly influenced by our peers. Often sustainability practitioners feel overwhelmed when implementing programming as they say, “it’s just me!” I say look for ways to mobilize your employees and make them all owners and leaders. Create a clear process to show your followers how to follow, so they can then easily communicate the process to other potential followers.

Focus on key messaging and ongoing dialogue.  Be consistent in your messaging, frequency and contact channels with your communications and engagement. Focus on regular messaging communications, activities and feedback. If we want activities to be embedded into our organizational ethos, it needs to be part of an ongoing conversation, not only a few times per year when specific activities are launched.

Want to learn more? Watch for the next installment of her 6-part “Start a sustainability movement “ series. Part 2 will focus on building stakeholder buy-in at every level of the organization.




Start a Sustainability Movement Series:

  • Part 1: Steps to follow
  • Part 2: Building buy-in at every level
  • Part 3: How to scale
  • Part 4: How to systemize
  • Part 5: All in for sustainability
  • Part 6: Fostering culture & embedding sustainability

Leave a Comment! We would love to hear your thoughts! Please leave a comment or question below. Also feel free to post any burning issues that you would like to see covered in this series.

You can find Wendy on Twitter:@EngageIntl or LinkedIn: Wendy Firlotte

Wendy is a Sustainability Employee Engagement Specialist. She specializes in translating high-level strategy and vision into purpose driven, embedded and aligned employee action. She’s a great asset to our guest blog here on CrowdLeaf.




Announcement of a regular Green Show on @VoiceFMradio by @rwscarter

Some of you have already listened to @rwscarter on VoiceFm recently, some of you are so dedicated that you have heard both of his appearance so far. Credit where it is due, that cannot have been as easy as listening to Adam from Green Hampshire or Denise from ‘Eco Hair and Beauty‘. Both the earlier show and the now regular slot. On that occasion (my first VoiceFm appearance) I was with the wonderful Denise Baden from Southampton University who was discussing the great initiative ‘Eco Hair and Beauty’ which have written for us here at @CrowdLeaf before. She also discussed the sustainability agenda in Cuba- which she tied in rather nicely with her musical ‘Fidel’. More of that can be found here along with a link to that guest appearance below.




Like wise the new green show on VoiceFM – hosted by Xan Philips and the green agenda taken forward by @rwscarter on Xan’s ‘The Business show’ every first Thursday of the month from 8pm- 9pm.

The December the 1st episode can be found above – With the inside scoop on all things Christmas ,Autumn Statement, local green campaigns, national crowdfunding news and the green agenda and insights, from £5 notes to electric vans.

As @rwscarter is now a regular guest- the first in the sequence of Green issues radio appearances os merely the start, we want your green news, campaigns and insights to share live on air. At the moment this scheduled be broadcast every first Thursday of each month from 8 PM however we are both human and sometime this may change, so keep an eye on our twitter and on here. You can tune in on 103.9FM or find us online at : http://www.voicefmradio.co.uk   . If you happen to miss the show but still want to listen, perhaps you want to take us for a train journey, or on a long walk  – there is both a listen live and as you’ve  probably noticed from the links above a ‘listen again’ option.  Thanks as always for being here with us – keep your green news, campaigns, opportunities and more coming our way. Equally there is room for suggested sustainability/green/conservation songs – please do share your suggestions.




CONSERVATION, CULTURE, COMMERCE AND CRIME – Tackling Ivory Trade @UoPBusiness

This Hot Topic is aimed at anyone with an interest in the law and economics of the illegal wildlife trade and specifically the trade in elephant ivory. The British Government is under pressure to ban the sales of all ivory, including ivory antiques but what effect will this really have on the current declining elephant populations?




Elephant population numbers are seriously declining due to poaching activity to provide illegal ivory for crafted items, sculpture and jewellery. Despite seemingly robust legislation controlling legal ivory sales (including export permit requirements for UK sales abroad) and the that fact that synthetic ivory can now be created to the same diagnostic standards as genuine ivory, selling at a fraction of the cost, the demand for the ‘real thing’ continues to rise in craft and antique markets with very few prosecutions in the UK. Moreover, there is evidence to suggest that “ghost ivory” (post-1947 worked ivory being sold as pre-1947 worked ivory) is being sold by traders to the unsuspecting and uneducated buyer. Two key illegal sub-markets are identified and a socio-legal and economic analysis of the regulatory options available is presented.

SPEAKERS:

CAROLINE COX, SCHOOL OF LAW, PORTSMOUTH BUSINESS SCHOOL

Caroline specialises in Equity & Trusts and Public Law which she teaches on the undergraduate program.  She is also an Employability co-ordinator for the Law School and teaches on the Research and Professional Development undergraduate course, preparing students for life after graduation. Caroline teaches conveyancing on the CILEX accredited course to both undergraduate and post graduates.  “I try to show my students that as lawyers we need to be able to communicate our knowledge to our clients, colleagues and fellow professionals. At Portsmouth we are strong advocates of links between the university and its students and the profession. Employability is key. Preparation for professional life is vital.”

Caroline joined the University in 2014 after 18 years in private practice where she specialised in Private Client matters, including wills and trusts, inheritance tax planning and elderly client advice (particularly in relation to mental capacity and powers of attorney). She has also advised new and established charities with regards to regulations and governance issues and she has acted a Trustee for a local charity.

PROFESSOR ALAN COLLINS, PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS, PORTSMOUTH BUSINESS SCHOOL

Alan is Professor of Economics and Head of the Economics and Finance Subject Group.  Previously, he was a Research Fellow, Strathclyde University and an Engineer/Planner with Babtie Consulting Engineers based in West Yorkshire. Alan teaches a wide range of subjects at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. His teaching interests include Environmental Economics and Policy, Managerial Economics, Social Economics, Transport Economics, and Cultural Economics.He is an active researcher in a number of fields, the most significant of which are environmental and natural resource economics,  urban and transport economics, social and cultural economics.

  • Date: 9 November 2016
  • Venue: Portsmouth Business School
Programme

5.30pm – Registration and refreshments
6.00pm – Guest speakers
7.00pm – Question & answer session
7.30pm – Networking with cheese and wine

Car parking is available on site after 5pm for a fixed fee of £2. For more details, maps and directions to the venue, please see our website.

 

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